Reviews

Hello There! China

October 20, 2009
by Ian Bell

ACCORDING TO THE CHATTER, Rupert Murdoch is bored with Britain. These days, the lately-acquired Wall Street Journal consumes his attention. The editor of London’s Times is shipped out to Manhattan to tend the new toy – a pointed reminder of relative values – and one of the progeny is gifted the...

Volume 4 – Issue 1 – Gallimaufry

October 20, 2009
by Lesley McDowell

Meas Air Chrannaibh (Fruit On Branches) Aonghas Pàdraig Caimbeul ACAIR, £13.00 pp328, ISBN 086152330X A dodo language, Gaelic “is like a patient lying/weak on her deathbed”, according to its nurse, Aong-has Pàdraig Caimbeul. Certainly, as if futureproofing his verse from one of language’s regular...

Auschwitz: A Neverending Story

October 20, 2009
by Elwira M Grossman

ANYONE WRITING TODAY on the Holocaust is haunted by the thought that the decimated generation of Holocaust survivors will soon pass away. Consequently, the question of how to preserve their voices and memory poses major challenges to post-war generations. Angela Morgan Cutler’s experimental novel...

The Real Tartan Army at War

October 20, 2009
by Trevor Royle

AS NATIONAL EVENTS are viewed by the public, the emergence of The Royal Regiment of Scot-land on March 28 2006 was hardly an event of seismic proportions. No big parades, tar-tanry kept to a minimum and only a few fellows in kilts with bagpipes. A handful of soldiers were presented with the new cap...

Rebel Reinvented

October 20, 2009
by Ajay Close

IN 1996 REBEL INC published Children Of Albion Rovers, six tales of “underdogs, losers and psycho-active users” by Irvine Welsh, Alan Warner, Laura Hird, Gordon Legge, Paul Reekie and one James Meek. It became a cult classic, required reading for student and schemie alike: the sort of book that...

Volume 4 – Issue 2 – Reviews

October 19, 2009

Glister John Burnside JONATHAN CAPE, £12.99 pp259, ISBN 9780224080743 REVIEWER: ALASDAIR MACRAE John Burnside’s previous novel, The Devil’s Footprints, is subtitled a romance, and it is a romantic story of a very vexed and vexing sort where ‘romance’ seems, at best, ironic. The term ‘romance’...

Only Connect

October 19, 2009
by Lesley McDowell

WHEN I ATTENDED university, probably around the same time that Andrew Crumey did, it was pretty much a given that arts students and science students looked down on each other’s work. Science thought art lazed in bed till lunch-time and sat exams a two-year-old could pass; art despised science’s...

Westward Ho!

October 19, 2009
by Brian Morton

In his ‘Cornish Heroic Song For Valda Trevlyn’, Hugh MacDiarmid makes much of the connections between Cornwall and Scotland: not just their marriage, or the reproduction “golden lunula” he has made for her – “Linking the Early Bronze Age and the Twentieth Century” – but also something...

Volume 4 – Issue 2 – Gallimaufry

October 19, 2009
by Lesley McDowell

Missy Chris Hannan CHATTO AND WINDUS, £12.99 pp304 ISBN 0701180439 This debut novel by award-winning playwright Hannan is about as good as storytelling gets. Missy is the colloquial name for opium in mid-nineteenth century California, and heroine Dol, “flash-girl”, has quite a taste for it. When...

Love Craft

October 19, 2009
by Pat Kane

IF THE DEFINITION of a craftsman, according to the social philosopher Richard Sennett, is someone who is “dedicated to good work for its own sake”, then in my own family I have known (or known of) at least two craftsmen of note (one of which, to be precise, is a craftswoman). My namesake and grandfather,...