Elizabeth Rimmer

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that has been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Login
Elizabeth Rimmer

Elizabeth Rimmer

Elizabeth Rimmer was born and educated in Liverpool and moved to Scotland in 1977. Poet, gardener and river-watcher, her roots are Catholic, radical, feminist and green Her poems have appeared in Poetry Scotland, Northwords Now, Gutter, Brittle Star and Eildon Tree, and her first full collection 'Wherever We Live Now' was published by Red Squirrel in 2011. More at http://burnedthumb.co.uk

Posted by on in Reader Reviews

A Northerly Land, by George Gunn, seems, at first glance, to be an unprepossessing collection. The production of the book is not good – the text of the poems is badly centred, to the point where some of it is some of it is cut off at the edges; the copyright information, the acknowledgements and epigraphs are crammed into one page; the cover image is uncredited, and the many footnotes are intrusive and poorly placed. This sloppiness looks occasionally as if it extends to the poetry, which is printed without punctuation and with inconsistent capitalisation, and it is a poor introduction to the work itself, some of which is outstanding.

Gunn writes in a style reminiscent of Kenneth White, and there are echoes of his Walking the Coast in Gunn’s Winter Coast, but Gunn is an angrier and more political poet than White, more friendly towards myth and metaphor, and concerned as much about the humans living in the landscape as much as the coasts, wildlife and weather of Caithness. Gunn’s free-flowing, undirected style works well in some shorter poems, such as September, and We Are All in This Together and exceptionally well in the lovely Rain in August where the transformations and interpenetrations of rain and land and sky – and fact and symbol – are echoed in the unsignposted and ambiguous form:

...
0

Posted by on in Reader Reviews

The Eejit Pit by Jenny Lindsay; The Glassblower Dances by Rachel McCrum; Treasure in the History of Things by Katherine McMahon

Stewed Rhubarbis a small Edinburgh publisher founded by Rachel McCrum and James T Harding which specialises in publishing spoken word artists and in collaborating to create beautiful poetry objects. These three short pamphlets are the first fruits of this outfit, and very beautiful objects they are too, printed on good quality paper, and with sturdy and beautifully designed covers. Treasure in the History of Things even comes with a cd of the artist reading her poems, with music and atmospheric sounds - a very good move, reminding us that performance poetry is not the same as a reading from page poems, but a genre in its own right, with its own demands and excellences.

...
0

Posted by on in Reader Reviews

In the introduction to These Islands We Sing editor Kevin MacNeil lays out the brief for this anthology:

--- a remit wide enough to bring in writing from any Scottish island, but distinct enough not to include Highland or other mainland work.

...
0